Objectives

academics objectives

 

 

Basic Science Objectives

 

Semester I 

 

MANT 0603 

Gross and Developmental Anatomy 

11 credits 

 

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Identify anatomical structures by their location, dimensions, relationship to other structures, surface projections and functions.
  2. Identify the nerve supply of anatomical structures.
  3. Identify the vascular supply of anatomical structures.
  4. Describe the relationship between morphology and function.
  5. Describe the embryological development of the adult structures.
  6. Apply anatomical knowledge to clinical scenarios.

  

MANT 0620

Histology

5 credits


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Describe the microscopic structure of the organ systems.
  2. Relate system structure to its basic physiological function.
  3. Identify structures on micrographs noting the information revealed by various staining techniques.
  4. Relate basic histopathology to the etiology of disease states.
  5. Correlate microscopic tissue structure with Cell and Molecular Biology and Gross and Developmental Anatomy.

  

MBIO 0650

Cell and Molecular Biology

6 credits


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Identify the basic structures and functional components of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates, and to understand how these macromolecules function within a living cell.
  2. Identify cellular structures in cellular schematics and electron micrograph images, interpret these structures and organelles with respect to their function, and apply that knowledge to the molecular basis of human disease.
  3. Demonstrate comprehension of DNA structure, replication, packaging, rearrangement and exchange, as well as of the processes of transcription and translation. Explain how gene expression, epigenetic mechanisms and replication are involved in human health and disease.
  4. Demonstrate comprehension of molecular-based techniques used in vitro and in vivo to analyze and manipulate nucleic acids and proteins, and to interpret results generated by these techniques.
  5. Identify and describe membrane constituents and how they regulate membrane structure and function.
  6. Demonstrate comprehension of cell signaling pathways responsible for regulating metabolism, gene expression, cell proliferation, immune response, survival and differentiation, and explain how dysregulation of these processes contribute to the development of disease in humans.
  7. Demonstrate comprehension of the cell cycle (including mitosis and meiosis) and cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and differentiation, and explain how dysregulation of these processes contribute to the development of disease in humans.
  8. Demonstrate understanding of the molecular basis of genomic instability, DNA damage and repair, and explain how dysregulation of these processes contribute to the development of disease in humans.
  9. Demonstrate comprehension of the molecular basis of neoplasia and cancer susceptibility.
  10. Utilize online resources to obtain and synthesize information essential to the process of evidence-based practice of medicine and to develop a better appreciation of abnormal molecular mechanisms involved in the origins of human disease.

 

MICM 0940

Medical Ethics

1 credit


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate understanding of the four pillars of ethics and how they influence clinical practice.
  2. Incorporate the U.S.M.L.E. Rules of Doctor/Patient relationships in the assessment, care planning, and interventional aspects of patient care.
  3. Demonstrate understanding of the AMA stance on conflict of interest, professional boundaries, informed consent, advanced directives, ethical research and end of life care.
  4. Incorporate guidelines of H.I.P.P.A., local laws and regulations, ethics committees, and AMA in analyzing and resolving ethical dilemmas.

  

MICM 0660

Introduction to Physical Diagnosis

2 credits


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Determine the importance of comprehensive and focused history taking.
  2. Obtain a complete medical history from the patient and or informant.
  3. Identify and demonstrate the various verbal and non-verbal communication skills while conducting the patient interview.
  4. Recognize and demonstrate professionalism while interacting with patient, family, peers and teachers.
  5. List the various parameters of vital signs and should be able to obtain vital signs.
  6. Identify the various steps in examining the cardiac, respiratory and musculo-skeletal system.
  7. Demonstrate the skills in performing the physical examination of Cardiac, respiratory and musculo-skeletal systems.

 

Semester II


MPHY 0711

Physiology

10 credits


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Describe the fundamental mechanisms underlying normal function of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems of the human body, commensurate with the requirements for a physician providing care to patients.
  2. Explain the basic mechanisms of homeostasis by integrating the functions of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems.
  3. Apply knowledge of functional mechanisms and their regulation to explain the pathophysiology underlying common diseases.
  4. Describe the molecular and cellular mechanisms of physiological processes that are the basis for therapeutics and drug targets that are introduced later in the curriculum.
  5. Effectively solve basic problems in Physiology and Pathophysiology, working independently and in groups.

 

MBIO 0760

Biochemistry

7 credits


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Have a clear understanding of the subcellular organelles, various cellular proteins and signaling mechanism that they have studied in cell and molecular biology with the biochemical functions that goes on in each cell. Students will have thorough understanding of the fundamental principles of biochemistry especially in relation to various metabolic pathways that are important in understanding a medical disorder. Students will be able to integrate various metabolic pathways for overall understanding of the metabolic processes that go on in our cells.
  2. Have a better understanding of fate of various macro and micronutrients that we take in the diet. Students will have better understanding of the digestion and absorption process of all these molecules, and of the abnormalities that can occur during these processes. Students will be able to connect the role of various vitamins and mineral in the metabolic pathways, and the abnormalities that can occur when these micronutrients are deficient or in excess. This will eventually enable students to understand the treatment and monitoring of these disorders.
  3. Integrate metabolic processes with clinical disorders and applied physiological aspects. This kind of integration will assist students with better understanding of physiological changes that will go on in the body according the physiological status of the cell. Constant integration of clinical disorders is done throughout the course so that students will have better understanding of a disorder at the molecular level. This will assist students in clinical diagnosis, modes of treatment, monitoring and prognosis of a disorder, along with helping to determine the differential diagnosis for disorders which share similar phenotype.
  4. Have a better understanding of normal biochemical functions of various enzymes, which will assist them in understanding the disorder when there is abnormality in any of these enzymes. With the thorough background of enzymes and biochemical process, students will have a better understanding of rationale for using various medications in disorders affecting metabolic pathways.
  5. Have sufficient exposure to all the high yield concepts and questions for their preparation towards USMLE Step 1 exam and beyond. 

 

MBIO 0770

Genetics

3 credits


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Understand the molecular mechanisms of how chromosomal abnormalities and genetic mutations lead to aneuploidies, genomic disorders, single gene diseases, and complex disorders.
  2. Understand the strategy and technology used for gene mapping and disease gene identification.
  3. Describe the current approaches for the treatment of genetic disease including gene therapy.
  4. Understand the recent advances in prenatal diagnosis, cancer genetics, and pharmacogenetics.
  5. Other skills learned by the students will be evaluation of pedigrees, calculating recurrence risk, and using Hardy-Weinberg to determine mutation frequencies in populations. 

 

MBEH 0920

Biostatistics and Epidemiology

2 credits


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Understand the basic concepts and principles of epidemiology.
  2. Identify the basic strategies for observational and experimental studies.
  3. Use the epidemiologic approach to define and measure the occurrence of disease and health in populations.
  4. Identify data needs for calculating standard epidemiological measures.
  5. Understand collection of scientific data, appropriate analysis using statistical tests and results interpretation.
  6. Distinguish the roles of epidemiology and biostatistics in the prevention of disease and the improvement of health.

 

 

MMCR 823

Immunology

2 credits


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Describe the cells and tissues involved with innate and adaptive immunity.
  2. Know the molecular and cellular mechanisms employed in innate immune responses, and those used in the humoral and cell-mediated arms of adaptive immunity.
  3. Know the details of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting cells and the central role of MHC molecules in this process.
  4. Understand the maturation and selection of B and T lymphocytes and how gene rearrangement generates the diverse antigen receptors required for lymphocyte activation.
  5.  Understand how activated lymphocytes carry out different effector functions and produce memory during a humoral or cell-mediated adaptive response.
  6. Understand the clinical aspects of immunology including tolerance and autoimmunity, transplantation and immunosuppression, immunotherapy strategies against tumors, hypersensitivity reactions, and the consequences of congenital immunodeficiencies.

 

 

Semester III 


MPAT 0800

Pathology I

9 credits


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Understand, identify, and describe changes that happen in cell injury and adaptation. Students must be able to solve clinical problem by explaining underlying pathology.
  2. Define acute and chronic inflammation, identify various types’ cells in inflammation, and explain the role of chemical mediators. Students must be able to analyze lab reports pertaining to inflammatory diseases.
  3. Describe the various types of hemodynamic disorders, identify the structural changes, and explain the underlying pathology.
  4. Name various benign, and malignant tumors, understand the differences between benign and malignant tumors, explain the biology of tumors, identify correctly histological features and have an overview of important cancers.
  5. Explain the immune basis of primary immune deficiency, and autoimmune disorders, describe various changes seen in the organs affected, and are able to interpret lab reports.
  6. Define, explain, and draw an algorithm to explain various types of anemia. Students should be able to evaluate cases of anemia, and interpret lab reports.
  7. Describe various types of reactive conditions associated with white cell abnormalities, discuss the various types of hematological malignancies based on pathogenesis, and be able to interpret lab investigations.
  8. Understand the pathogenesis of tumors involving renal, and prostate. Students must be able to identify histological features, interpret investigations, and explain clinical features of renal and prostate tumors.
  9. Identify, and distinguish testicular tumors. Discuss the morphological features, and clinical presentations of major testicular tumors.
  10. Differentiate, and describe various skin disorders of immune, infectious, and neoplastic origin.
  11. Define, describe, and identify diseases affecting the CNS. Students should be able to explain the pathogenesis of various developmental, demyelinating, dementia, and tumors affecting the CNS.

 

MNEU 0810

Neuroscience/Neuroanatomy

7 credits


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to

  1. Determine the location and type of spinal cord injuries.
  2. Evaluate the status of a neurological patient.
  3. Perform the neurological exam.
  4. Identify problems via neuro imaging techniques.
  5. Discuss site, level, and type of injury.

 

 

MMCR 0820

Microbiology

5 credits


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Identify the common etiologic agents of the disease and be able to determine the causative agent of the particular case from case clues.
  2. Classify general characteristics regarding disease or organism, predisposing conditions, epidemiology, mechanism of pathogenicity, and major tests used in identifications.
  3. Describe mechanisms of virulence and pathogenesis for microorganisms.
  4. Identify the appropriate therapies, drug mechanism of action and resistance mechanisms for antimicrobials, antivirals, antifungals and antiparasitics.

  

MBEH 0830

Behavioral Science

5 credits


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Describe the progression through the life cycle and recognize the major milestones from conception to death.
  2. Explain the psychological and social factors influencing patient behavior, noting both how those factors contribute to unhealthy behavior, disease or compliance/and resistance to treatment;
  3. Describe and demonstrate patient interviewing skills, peer consultation, and interactions with the family;
  4. Describe the normal processes and pathophysiology of the central & peripheral nervous systems, (brain stem, brain, motor systems and the autonomic nervous systems) as they relate to mental and emotional disorders;
  5. Construct a differential diagnosis and demonstrate the ability to diagnose disorders according to the DSM-5 criteria
  6. Recognize the signs and symptoms of the psychopathologic disorders and describe both the disorders, the signs and symptoms using proper terminology;
  7. Describe the general principles of psychotherapy and psychopharmacology, including the basic indications and contraindications;
  8. Recognize the gender, ethnic, and behavioral, i.e. biopsychosocial, considerations affecting disease treatment and prevention (including psychosocial, cultural, occupational, and environmental) and construct basic interventions to improve patient compliance to treatment 

 

Semester IV

 

MPAT 0900

Pathology II

12 credits


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Describe the etiology, pathogenesis, structural and functional manifestations of disease, and have the ability to use this knowledge to solve appropriate problems.
  2. Understand the biologic principles which govern changes in cells and tissues as a response to abnormal stimuli, and the functional consequences and clinical significance of morphologic changes.
  3. Understand how these changes alter during the course of the medical and surgical therapy and the differential diagnosis.
  4. Describe various specific changes which occur in specialized organs due to harmful pathogens and other agents.
  5. Recognize disease at the gross, microscopic and ultrastructural level.
  6. Understand the various pathological, molecular and immunologic techniques used to reach the diagnosis.
  7. Understand the dynamics of disease and be aware of the natural course of specific disease states and the result of intervention by a physician.
  8. Interpret the various pathology reports of various branches.
  9. Understand how Pathology as a medical specialty relates and contributes to clinical medicine.

 

 

MPHM 0910 

Pharmacology & Therapeutics 

7 credits


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Understand the fundamental principles of drug-receptor interactions and identify how drugs alter cellular function through the study of pharmacodynamics.
  2. Determine how the body handles drugs through pharmacokinetic processes such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, dose-response relationships, half-life, steady-state concentrations and volume of distribution and thereby affect therapeutic effectiveness.
  3. Identify how specific patient characteristics and genetics can affect the response to a particular class of drugs.
  4. Discuss the rationale behind designing different dosing regimens of particular drugs in specific patient populations.
  5. Evaluate the scientific basis underlying how two different drugs can interact within the body and can have undesirable effects either on drug concentrations or drug clinical effects.
  6. Identify and name the major classes of clinically important drugs which include drugs affecting the autonomic nervous system; anesthetics and analgesics; drugs to treat diseases of the cardiovascular system; drugs affecting the pulmonary system; antibiotics; drugs used to treat psychiatric disorders; drugs of abuse and drugs used to treat addiction; drugs that affect the immune system; drugs that affect the endocrine system; dietary supplements and herbal medications; antiviral drugs and chemotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of cancer.
  7. Provide specific examples, mechanisms of action, adverse effects, contraindications, and drug interactions for each drug or class of drugs.

 

MICM 0930

Introduction to Clinical Medicine

6 credits


Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Obtain a complete and (where necessary) focused medical history: Students will learn the skills for proficiently conducting a medical interview with patient &/or informant, focusing on the essential components of history taking.
  2. Perform a head to toe physical examination: skills of examining the various systems using checklists and skill sheets as guide.
  3. Synthesize findings from the physical exam and history in developing a diagnosis and/or differential diagnosis with possible explanations and ways to rule in and rule out certain illnesses or disease processes.
  4. Recommend or suggest specific lab tests or studies such as blood/body fluid or radiological investigations to confirm certain conditions responsible for patient’s illness.
  5. Adequately document all the details of the case (considering the above 4 points) and submit medical “H&P” reports and SOAP notes for evaluation.
  6. Exhibit professionalism: the student is expected to practice professionalism at all times while dealing with the patient, relatives, colleagues and teachers.
  7. Improve communication skills by participating in the above activities.
  8. Enhance learning through teamwork and small group based activities
  9. Facilitate learning through constructive feedback from faculty and peers
  10. Acquire the basic skills for oral presentations of “H&P” and SOAP notes

 

Clinical Objectives


The clinical years of the UMHS curriculum aim to prepare students who have mastered the Basic Sciences into students who can deal with patients and their problems in a hospital or outpatient milieu. The Maine Fifth Semester program begins this process. Numerous new clinical skills and considerable medical knowledge must be added to that which the student has previously acquired during semesters One thru Four. Beginning in the Fifth semester and thru years Three and Four the six core competencies will be stressed as students acquire both diagnostic and therapeutic skills. The Core Competencies are:

  • Patient Care
  • Medical Knowledge
  • Practice Based Learning and Improvement
  • System Based Practice
  • Professionalism
  • Interpersonal Skills and Communication

 

Medical knowledge is of two types – factual and conceptual. The vast amount of knowledge required and the ever accelerating rate of discovery reinforces the notion that the practicing physician must forever be a student of medicine and a life-long learner. This provides a framework on which to arrange rapidly changing and increasingly detailed medical information.

 

UMHS is committed to a competency based curriculum. Students will be graded and receive pertinent feedback.

  • Self assessment of weakness
  • Analysis
  • Identification of problems

 

Family Medicine Core

Educational Objectives 

 

Patient Care: 

  • Provide comprehensive and continuous care to individuals of all ages
  • Demonstrate the ability to integrate the best medical evidence in making diagnostic and treatment decisions for individual patients
  • Utilize creativity and flexibility when providing patient care for individuals of all ages, socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds
  • Document the ability to record appropriate acute and chronic care of the patient in a problem oriented format
  • Demonstrate the ability to obtain a comprehensive history, perform a physical exam and develop a differential diagnosis when evaluating patients with acute and chronic medical problems
  • Demonstrate the ability to conduct a wellness visit for a patient of any age or gender
  • Order appropriate diagnostic tests which are cost effective, evidence based, and consistent with patient values and goals

 

Medical Knowledge: 

  • Preventive medicine will be emphasized primarily in the outpatient setting
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the diagnosis and treatment of the clerkship topics, utilizing the six ACGME Core Competencies
  • Integrate information from the history and physical to develop a differential diagnosis and treatment plan which are developed using evidence based, patient centered outcomes
  • Develop treatment plans for individuals of all ages and cultural backgrounds

 

Interpersonal Skills and Communication: 

  • Demonstrate proficiency in presenting clinical cases in SOAP format
  • Demonstrate proficiency and sensitivity while interacting with colleagues, faculty physicians, nurses, staff, and patients
  • Identify how family relationships impact health and illness and provide appropriate support for the individual patient and their family
  • Demonstrate the use of both verbal and non-verbal communication skills in optimizing the care of patients and their families

 

Practice Based Learning and Improvement: 

  • Indentify the use of Quality Assurance as it relates to patient care
  • Utilization of practice guidelines to optimize patient care
  • Critically appraise the literature to identify the varied treatment options in the care of patients
  • Utilize patient preference and best available evidence in clinical decision making
  • Appreciate the impact of physician experience
  • Discuss relevant research in the clinical setting


Professionalism: 

  • Demonstrate moral and ethical qualities when interacting with patients, colleagues, and healthcare providers
  • Identify limitations in treating and curing patients
  • Demonstrate the ability to react in an appropriate and empathetic manner in stressful situations
  • Learn your personal biases and control them for the patient’s welfare
  • Consistently approach your work and patients in a professional manner, consistent with other physicians and physicians in-training

 

System Based Practice: 

  • Recognize the significance of cost effective healthcare
  • Recognize the unequivocal value of primary care as an integral part of any health care system
  • Utilize patient advocate systems, resources, and information, to coordinate and improve care
  • Recognize the importance of treating your patients within the context of their families and communities
  • Integrate healthcare systems to provide continuous and diverse comprehensive care of patients and populations
  • Specific goals and objectives are detailed within the Family Medicine Clerkship curriculum document

 


Internal Medicine Core

Educational Objectives

 

Patient Care: 

  • Take a comprehensive history and perform a complete physical exam
  • Formulate a differential diagnosis and therapeutic plan, employing concern for risks, benefits, and costs
  • Document proficiently and timely
  • Analyze and document additional clinical information, lab tests and changes in patients’ clinical status
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the indications for, and the ability to interpret, standard diagnostic tests, (e.g., CBC, chemistries LFT’s, Chest X-Rays, urinalysis, EKG’s)
  • Demonstrate proficiency in basic procedures, such as venipuncture, insertion of intravenous lines, urinary bladder catheterization, etc.

 

Medical Knowledge: 

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the principal syndromes and illnesses in Internal Medicine, their pathophysiologies, and the various diagnostic and therapeutic options
  • Ask questions – fill in the gaps
  • Interpersonal Skills and Communications:
  • Demonstrate facility in communication with patients, families and other caregivers in a culturally competent manner
  • Demonstrate comfort in dealing with people of varying racial, cultural, and religious backgrounds

 

Practice Based Learning and Improvement: 

  • Demonstrate a regimen of independent learning through the reading of suggested basic texts, research via the Internet and through other electronic resources, (e.g., UpToDate, MKSAP for students)
  • Demonstrate a commitment to quality, patient safety and self-directed improvement
  • Professionalism:
  • Demonstrate a commitment to treating everyone – patients, families and other caregivers, with respect
  • Participating fully in the patient care team and fulfilling all responsibilities in a timely fashion
  • Maintain a professional appearance and demeanor
  • Volunteer for needed care if patient care is under staffed

 

System Based Practice: 

  • Demonstrate facility in working in concert with other caregivers, nutritionists, and social workers/discharge planners to obtain optimal, seamless multidisciplinary care for their patients, both during the hospitalization and after discharge
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the indications for various levels of care post-discharge (e.g., long term rehabilitation, long-term skilled nursing facility care, hospice, home care, etc.)
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of, and concern for, advance directives, informed consent, patient confidentiality (HIPAA), and palliative and end of life issues 

 

 

OB/Gyn Core

Educational Objectives

 

Patient Care: 

  • To learn the art of a completed and relevant reproductive history, including ethical issues as well as violence against women
  • To learn the indications for and interpretation of the common laboratory tests used in the specialty of obstetrics and gynecology
  • To observe and learn basic procedures, common to the specialty of Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Fundamental to this learning is the active participation in the care of at least one woman throughout the course of labor and delivery and follow up

 

Medical Knowledge: 

  • To understand mechanisms of diseases related to women’s health including normal reproductive physiology and pathology
  • To understand the mechanisms of actions, toxicities and proper use of major pharmacologic agents as they affect women and, in pregnancy, the fetus

 

Interpersonal Skills and Communication: 

  • To learn the importance and techniques of educating and counseling patients and their families regarding reproductive health

 

Professionalism: 

  • Demonstrate highest levels of integrity and sensitivity to women’s issues

 

 

Pediatrics Core

Educational Objectives

 

Patient Care: 

  • Perform a complete and age appropriate pediatric history and physical examination, including developmental assessment from infancy to adolescence
  • Make informed decisions about diagnostic and therapeutic interventions based on patient information and preferences, up-to-date scientific evidence, and clinical judgment
  • Develop and carry out a clinical assessment and plan
  • Counsel and educate patients and their families
  • Perform competently all medical and invasive procedures appropriate to level of training and supervision
  • Provide health care services aimed at preventing health problems or maintaining health

 

Medical Knowledge: 

  • Obtain knowledge of disease pathophysiology, diagnosis and etiology should be mastered
  • Gain knowledge of disease management
  • Gain knowledge of prevention and health maintenance guidelines
  • Critically evaluate and use current medical information and scientific evidence for patient care

 

Interpersonal and Communication Skills: 

  • Communicate effectively both orally and in writing and demonstrate caring and respectful behaviors when interacting with patients and their families
  • Create and sustain a therapeutic and ethically sound relationship with patients and parents
  • Work effectively with others as a member or leader of a health care team

 

Professionalism: 

  • Adherence to ethical principles and sensitivity to diversity
  • Demonstrate respect, compassion, integrity and honesty
  • A responsiveness to the needs of patients and society that supersedes self interest
  • Accountability to patients, society and the profession
  • A commitment to excellence and on-going professional development
  • Demonstrate sensitivity and responsiveness to a diverse patient population
  • Patient confidentiality adhered to
  • Strive to be culturally competent

 

Psychiatry Core

Educational Objectives

 

Patient Care: 

  • Demonstrate the ability to obtain a complete psychiatric history, perform a complete mental status exam, and recognize significant physical findings
  • Identify the major psychiatric disorders, e.g. mood and anxiety disorders, psychoses, personality disorders, substance disorders, and disorders involving cognitive impairment (delirium, dementia)
  • Acquire a basic fund of knowledge about these disorders
  • Be familiar with the major classes of psychotropic medications, including pretreatment work-up, indications and contraindications, charting and adequate maintenance dose ranges, common drug interactions, and common side effects
  • Assess and begin emergency management and referral of a patient with psychiatric symptoms
  • Develop a familiarity with basic psychotherapy concepts
  • Professional behavior and open, honest communication with patients at all times

 

Medical Knowledge: 

  • Demonstrate medical knowledge sufficient to express an understanding of different psychiatric symptoms, such as the recovery model vs. the medical model
  • Demonstrate a strong fund of knowledge of psychopathology and psychopathophysiology
  • Demonstrate a strong working knowledge of DSM IV and the diagnostic criteria for major psychiatric disorders
  • Participate in developing comprehensive treatment plans
  • Understand the basics of psychopharmacologic and psychotherapeutic approaches
  • Develop decision-making skills for treatment options

 

Interpersonal Skills and Communication: 

  • Conduct an interview in a manner that promotes information gathering and a therapeutic alliance
  • Develop a sense of comfort with disturbed patients and patients with chronic psychiatric illnesses, with an awareness of your reactions to these patients
  • Demonstrate proficiency in presenting clinical cases
  • Identify how family relationships impact mental health and illness and provide appropriate support for the individual patient and their family
  • Demonstrate the use of both verbal and non-verbal communication skills in optimizing the care of patients and their families

 

Practice Based Learning and Improvement: 

  • Indentify issues of quality and safety as it relates to psychiatric patient care
  • Critically appraise the literature to identify the varied treatment options in the care of patients
  • Utilize patient preference and best available evidence in clinical decision making
  • Appreciate the impact of physician experience
  • Discuss relevant research in the clinical setting

 

Professionalism: 

  • Demonstrate moral and ethical qualities when interacting with patients, colleagues, and healthcare providers
  • Identify limitations in treating and caring for patients
  • Demonstrate the ability to react in an appropriate and empathetic manner in stressful situations
  • Learn your personal biases and control them for the patient’s welfare

 

System Based Practice: 

  • Recognize the significance of cost effective healthcare
  • Understand the variety of community resources available to psychiatric patients and how to assess and access different levels of care depending on the patients’ needs.
  • Utilize patient advocate systems, resources, and information, to coordinate and improve care
  • Integrate healthcare systems to provide continuous and diverse comprehensive care of patients and populations

 


Surgery Core

Educational Objectives

 

Patient Care: 

  • Students will be required to record all procedures in log books that they are required to perform and observe during the surgical rotation
    • Perform under supervision (as in Fifth semester)
    • Arterial puncture for blood gas analysis and interpret results
    • Insert foley catheter both in male and female patients
    • Placement of a nasogastric tube
    • Wound dressing changes
    • Place and remove sutures and staples
    • Endotachial intubation
  • Observe (if available)
    • Placement of thoracostomy tube and management of underwater seal drain
    • Paracentesis, thoracentesis
    • Spinal and epidural anesthesia
    • Resuscitation of a patient in shock
    • Endoscopic procedures
  • Demonstrate the ability to do a proper detailed complete physical exam
  • Demonstrate the ability to identify common surface anatomical land marks
  • Demonstrate skill specific to the following areas
  • Out-patient clinics
  • E.D.
  • O.R.

 

Interpersonal Skills and Communication: 

  • Identify the importance and details of obtaining informed consent for operations/procedures
  • Observe when possible the manner in which attending/consultants have difficult discussions with patients and family e.g. complications of operations, need for reoperations, futility of care etc.
  • Identify in a proactive manner whenever cultural issues affect surgical practice and as in use of blood in Jehovah’s witnesses
  • Identify the importance of communication in multidisciplinary care of surgical patient in an environment of mutual respect

 

Practice Base Learning:

  • Evidence-based decisions and discussions should always precede surgical intervention, e.g. breast constructive surgery vs. mastectomy
  • Use appropriate on-line resources for up-to-date information, read relevant sources on each case
  • Refine problem-solving skills by seeking supervision in all cases both pre-op and post-op

 

Professionalism:

  • Demonstrate proper behavior in and outside the operating room at all times function as a part of the surgical team to which assigned, being responsible to be punctual, involved and be in appropriate arena, which may include the ER, OR, ICU, and floors at various times
  • Realize the limits of one’s position on the team so as not to engage patient and family in discussions about their care beyond the limits of that position
  • Do not discuss cases in public areas like hospital elevators and hallways

 

System Based Learning:

  • Be aware of cost/benefit ratio in the implementation of new technologies in the surgical arena e.g. laparoscopic and robotic surgery, laser technologies
  • Recognize the importance of ancillary services in the continuum of care of surgical patients – visiting nurse programs, rehabilitation services, etc.

 

 

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